Dangerous World For A Motorcyclist

@peellawfirmMotorcycles

Motorcyclist

Motorcycling 28 Times More Deadly

Per mile traveled, motorcyclist fatalities occurred nearly 28 times more frequently than passenger vehicle occupant fatalities in traffic crashes (NCSA 2018).

Motorcycle riders and their passengers—have the highest risk of fatal injury among all motor vehicle users. In 2016, 5,286 motorcyclists died in traffic crashes in the United States (NCSA 2018).

The most common cause of motorcycle accidents is not the occasional fellow kicking up a wheelie on the interstate. Certainly, that is dangerous. But the most common serious accident that involves a motorcyclist will almost always involve a car whose driver did not see the motorcycle.

The most common type of accident we handle involving motorcycles is a failure to yield. In most cases, the motorcyclist has the right-of-way and is traveling at whatever the speed limit is when a car pulls out across the path without seeing or yielding to rider.

Unfortunately, due to physics, the motorcyclist usually pays the price for the negligence of the driver of the errant car.

Traumatic brain injuries are common, even with helmets. Lower leg injuries are also rampant in these collisions.

Anything riders can do to increase their visibility to traffic that may not see them easily is an improvement. Some riders will continuously cycle their headlights from high beam to low beam and back when approaching vehicles.

For drivers of vehicles, remember to look left then right then left again. And don’t allow yourself to simply look for a full-size vehicle, because all you may be able to see is a single fast-moving point of light.

When cars and trucks don’t yield, especially on left turns, the riders have no place to go.

Mr. Peel seeks justice for those injured in motorcycle, truck and car accidents, disability and medical malpractice. He often addresses churches, clubs and groups without charge. Mr. Peel may be reached through PeelLawFirm.com wherein other articles may be accessed.